Rhetoric

Rhetoric

On January 8, 2011, a man enjoying a Saturday and a child were gunned down by a criminal, intent on making a name for himself.  Was this the act of a susceptible individual who had been tortured and driven to commit such a heinous crime by the “hate-filled” political rhetoric manufactured by the news media, radio, cable or the internet?

Ask someone from Lakeland, Florida.  That is where this tragedy played out.

Juan Castillo, age 19 was shot and killed and his 11-year old little brother, Jake, was critically wounded in a drive-by shooting at their home.  A known gang member, Alejandro Baez Garcia has been arrested, confessed and charged with first-degree murder.  According to a release from the Polk County Sheriff’s Office, Baez-Garcia and four other gang members targeted a bicyclist wearing rival gang colors riding in front of the Castillo house just as Baez-Garcia commenced firing a small-caliber handgun.

This is crime in America.  It is no different than crime in Arizona despite the fact that the President, the Governor, Congressmen from other States or an Indian Shaman didn’t appear in Lakeland to console the victim’s parents.  Ask yourself these questions:

Are Juan’s parents any less distraught or grieved than the relatives or friends of the victims in Arizona?

Do you think the shooter, Baez-Garcia, can even spell rhetoric?

Do you believe that any kind of gun control would have prevented Baez-Garcia from obtaining a weapon or limited his clip capacity?

Do you want your government to decide what rhetoric is acceptable and what rhetoric holds some subliminal imagery that is politically incorrect?

Rhetoric based on fact is not the problem.  The problem is that your television, newspaper, radio or internet connection doesn’t come with a lie-detector option.